John Mayer: Americans ruin concert experience

John Mayer: Americans ruin concert experience

CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW? John Mayer wants concert goers to put down their cell phones. Photo: Associated Press

John Mayer has to check his U.S. performances online hours after he has left the stage because fans are so busy capturing the show on their cellphones he has no way of knowing if they’re really enjoying themselves.

The “Daughters” singer claims American concertgoers have become hooked on the race to get footage online and it’s spoiling their enjoyment at gigs.

Mayer explains, “People aren’t going crazy and I think to myself, ‘I’m not playing a very good show,’ and then I look out (into the audience) and they are going crazy, but not for me… they’re applauding into the phone.

“So what I do now is I finish the show and I search myself on Instagram to see how people would have cheered had they not had a phone in their hand.”

Mayer insists he doesn’t have the same problems when performing in other countries. He tells U.S. chat show host Jimmy Kimmel, “We just came back from South America and it was, like, 35,000 people going crazy.”

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