Only arguing remains in Sterling trial

Only arguing remains in Sterling trial

Shelly Sterling sits with her husband, Donald Sterling, right, during the Los Angeles Clippers' NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons in Los Angeles on Nov. 12, 2010. Photo: Associated Press/Mark J. Terrill, File

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Only final arguments and a ruling remain in the trial to determine whether Donald Sterling’s estranged wife can sell the Los Angeles Clippers to former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer for $2 billion.

Lawyers for Sterling plan to argue Monday that Shelly Sterling had no right to make the deal with Ballmer, even though Donald Sterling had given her written authority to pursue a sale.

The attorneys also say she tricked Donald Sterling into taking mental exams that found he had signs of the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

That finding was sufficient for him to be removed as a trustee of the Sterling Family Trust and allow Shelly Sterling to move forward with the sale of the team.

Later in the process, however, Donald Sterling tried to stop the sale by dissolving the trust.

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