Giants’ Eli Manning accused of selling fake memorabilia

Giants’ Eli Manning accused of selling fake memorabilia

SUPER FAKES?: New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning, accompanied by team co-owner Steve Tisch, second from right, stops to sign autographs before ringing the New York Stock Exchange closing bell, Thursday, Jan. 30. Photo: Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — A sports memorabilia collector in New Jersey is accusing members of the NFL’s New York Giants of engaging in a scam to sell fake “game-worn” equipment for profit.

Eric Inselberg of Short Hills filed suit in Bergen County Superior Court on Wednesday against quarterback Eli Manning, Giants owner John Mara and others for allegedly doctoring jerseys, helmets and other equipment to make it look as though they had been used during play.

Manning and the Giants issued statements saying the suit is without merit and they planned to fight it.

Inselberg was among a group of memorabilia dealers accused of selling counterfeit jerseys following an FBI sting.

The Justice Department case against Inselberg was dropped. He says in court papers he wants the Giants held accountable for the lies that led to his indictment and ruined his business.

Recent Headlines

in Music

Will Smith planning to tour with DJ Jazzy Jeff


The "Independence Day" star is reuniting with his longtime friend for a world tour as part of his musical comeback.

in Music

Mississippi grants title to B.B. King


Even though B.B. King died in May, he's still so respected in Mississippi that the state is bestowing a special honor upon him.

in Music

Ellie Goulding battling heart condition


The "Burn" singer received the frightening news last year, but she has been too busy to follow it up with her doctor.

in Music

Taylor Swift tops Instagram


The ladies of pop music are commanding the most followers on Instagram, the photo-sharing app said as it celebrated its fifth birthday.

in Entertainment, Sports

DraftKings, FanDuel defend integrity after insider bet


The two major U.S. sports fantasy companies are defending their businesses' integrity after an employee used insider information to place bets in the unregulated multi-billion-dollar industry.